Welcome to Explore Del Norte

Itineraries

Whether you’re planning a short visit or to stay for a while, you can use these special itineraries to guide you to some of the places you just shouldn’t miss. Each one was developed and written by a local expert in his or her field who knows the county well. You will find soft adventure, high adventure, one-, two- and three-day recommendations.

We focus on redwoods, birding and easy going adventures, but you can use this site to put together your own itinerary customized to you own passions and the time that you have available.

 

SOFT ADVENTURE MAJESTIC REDWOOD FORESTS OF DEL NORTE COUNTY ITINERARY

The ancient coast redwood ecosystem preserved in the parks of Del Norte County contains some of the planet’s most majestic forests. Redwood trees are an American icon, the tallest trees in the world. These amazing complex forests, where trees frequently stretch skyward over 300 feet, beg for exploration.

Walking through a redwood grove on a fog-shrouded morning can be an unforgettable experience. Sounds are reduced to the musical gurgle of water trickling among ferns and mossy rocks. Light ebbs with the somber mist and shafts of sun hang like cobwebs. Stillness and peace weave their spells upon the adventuring traveler.

SOFT ADVENTURE REDWOOD FOREST ITINERARY DAY ONE: THE HOWLAND HILL/HIOUCHI LOOP

  • Head out on Howland Hill Road from Crescent City for a spectacular drive through old growth redwoods in Redwood National and State Parks.
  • Stop at the Nickerson Ranch trailhead and stretch your legs on a comfortable 2-mile walk along Mill Creek, over a moss covered bridge, finish on Howland Hill road back to your vehicle.
  • Proceed east to Stout Grove and the easy .5-mile walk through the river bottom grove of tremendous trees.
  • Continue east, following signs and through the covered bridge to Hwy. 199 and head west.
  • In Hiouchi, plan a lunch break or buy lunch and head for the picnic area in Jedediah Smith Redwood State Park, just west of town. Lounge among giant trees beside the Wild and Scenic Smith River. A little warm? Plan a cooling dip in the river. There isn’t a more beautiful place to spend a relaxing afternoon.
  • As you head back to Crescent City, top off your redwood experience with a stroll in the one-mile Simpson-Reed Nature Trail where you will encounter large redwoods, octopus trees (hemlock), and many redwood-associated plants.

SOFT ADVENTURE REDWOOD FOREST ITINERARY DAY TWO: KLAMATH REDWOODS

  • Plan to spend the morning at Trees of Mystery, maybe you will be greeted by Paul Bunyon and Babe the Blue Ox. Enjoy experiencing giant redwoods from the forest floor or aboard the Sky Trail, high up on the canopy. Be sure to catch the End of the Trail Museum, an extensive collection of Native American artifacts.
  • How about a drive through the base of a giant redwood? Head south on Hwy. 101 to the Klamath Tour-Thru Tree off the Terwer Valley exit.
  • For a magnificent mix of ocean views and redwood forest cross south of the Klamath River on Hwy. 101, take the first exit. Turn west to the mouth of the Klamath River and the Coastal Drive. You get off the beaten path on this adventure! This 8-mile rough and tumble road winds past expansive Pacific Ocean views. Look through binoculars at the massive off shore rocks to spy thousands of seabirds nesting. Whales, sea lions, and pelicans are often seen on this journey. (Recreational vehicles and vehicles pulling trailers are prohibited on Coastal Drive).
  • At the southern end of the Coastal Drive one can turn north and soon catch Hwy 101 back toward Klamath. An outstanding option is to turn south and capture the incredible Newton-Drury Parkway that traverses 7 miles through the heart of Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park until it intersects with Hwy. 101. Numerous short (and longer) hikes off the parkway offer wonderful options to get out in an inspiring old growth redwood forest and maybe see an elk or two in Elk Prairie.
  • As you return north, not to be missed is the awesome Klamath River overlook, mixing a vista of ocean and river mouth often teeming with wildlife. Travel west on Requa Road from Hwy. 101 and maybe see whales, sea lions, osprey, and more, along with the spectacular view.
  • Top off the day with an ocean sunset from along Hwy 101. Try the short walk to the beach at the Yurok Loop Trail for a private show, or park at one of the many overlooks like at Wilson Creek or Vista Point above Crescent City.

 

SOFT ADVENTURE REDWOOD FOREST ITINERARY MULTI-DAY: SLEEP AMONG THE ANCIENT TREES

  • For a memorable multi-day experience in the heart of an ancient redwood forest try camping at the Jedediah Smith Redwood State Park. The location of the Jed Smith campground is about perfect. In the summer the mixing of the cool coastal fog and warm inland temperatures creates an idyllic environment of moderate temperatures. In the winter, the campground is shielded from the intensity of Pacific storms by coastal hills and the redwood forest. In addition, the campground’s location next to the beautiful Smith River that teems with wildlife creates a wonderful place to camp. People have used this area for thousands of years.
  • In the summer a footbridge is installed across the Smith River that allows easy access to spectacular Stout Grove and the Mill Creek and Hiouchi trails. And fishing, the Smith River is world renowned for its salmon and steelhead runs. This is a classic camping experience in the truest sense.

HIGH ADVENTURE MAJESTIC REDWOOD FORESTS OF DEL NORTE COUNTY ITINERARY

The ancient coast redwood ecosystem preserved in the parks of Del Norte County contains some of the planet’s most majestic forests. Redwood trees are an American icon, the tallest trees in the world. These amazing complex forests, where trees frequently stretch skyward over 300 feet, beg for exploration.

Walking through a redwood grove on a fog-shrouded morning can be an unforgettable experience. Sounds are reduced to the musical gurgle of water trickling among ferns and mossy rocks. Light ebbs with the somber mist and shafts of sun hang like cobwebs. Stillness and peace weave their spells upon the adventuring traveler.

DAY ONE: REDWOODS AND THE SEA – BOY SCOUT AND BEACHES

  • For a great day mixing a hike through the heart of the redwood forest and a quiet beach experience try this one. First check a tide table and plan the beach experience at low tide.
  • For the forest part of the day head out for a short trip on Howland Hill Road from Crescent City to the Boy Scout Tree Trailhead (at Mile 5 on Howland Hill). This trail is moderate in difficulty with some uphill. The hike is about 6 miles in length and generally takes about 4 hours. This is an adventure into a classic mature redwood forest. Huge branches hang like elbows down the side of redwood trunks. Look ever skyward into the canopy to see another redwood tree on a massive redwood branch. Travel 2-1/2 miles to the fork that leads to Boy Scout Tree, a mammoth double-trunked redwood, and 3 miles to Fern Falls, a sparkling cascade that varies with the season.
  • For a wonderful place to dip your toe in the Pacific explore Enderts Beach and Crescent Beach Overlook. Absorb outstanding Pacific Ocean views from the overlook; you may even see a gray whale! Walk 1-mile to Enderts Beach, an access route to a multi-colored, myriad of tidepool creatures. Be sure to check low tide times. Take Enderts Beach Road off of Hwy. 101, 3 miles south of Crescent City. Trailers not advised.

 

DAY TWO: THE DAMNATION CREEK TRAIL

  • Damnation Creek: This strenuous 4-mile round trip hike through old-growth coastal forest to a private ocean setting has rewards around every corner. This is a steep trail that descends 1,000 feet through an ancient forest of immense redwoods, Sitka spruce, red alder, and all the forest has to offer, traversing all the way to the ocean. Used in the past by Tolowa Indians for food gathering at the ocean, the trail offers excellent photo opportunities of both the forest and the ocean. Expect at least three hours to complete in a hurry, most plan to enjoy the day. Bring your own water. Trailhead is located on Highway 101 at mile marker 16.0, south of Crescent City.
  • Not enough for you? Stretch out on the Last Chance section of the Coastal Trial which intersects the Damnation Creek Trail. You will be greeted by ocean vistas and more incredible trees!

 

DAY THREE: BIKES AND REDWOODS

Two great options for those with a mountain bike:

  • Howland Hill/Little Bald Hills: The first 10 miles of this trip is a relatively easy ride on the graded gravel surface of Howland Hill Road. The first climb out of Crescent City is the only tough grind. Crest the hill and the ride through the old growth redwood forest can’t be duplicated anywhere on the planet. This is amazing. At the Little Bald Hills trailhead off Howland Hill head south and start climbing. This trail climbs out of the redwood forest into mixed conifers and open prairies with spectacular views. The trail currently ends 5 miles out at the National and State Park boundary. The ride back down into the redwood forest makes the climb worth it. Return to Crescent City via Howland Hill.
  • Last Chance Section – Coastal Trail: A strenuous mountain bike ride, particularly to first several miles. This 12-mile trail (round trip) includes a difficult climb near the beginning then levels off on the old abandoned coast highway road. Trailhead is located at the end of Enderts Beach Road. Ocean vistas greet you in the first mile; side route (on foot) to Enderts Beach allows tidepool exploration. Trail ascends on the tough climb through red alder and Sitka spruce and meets old-growth redwood forest. Junction with Damnation Creek Trail exists at milepost 16.0 (bikes not permitted on Damnation Creek); continue south to Coastal Trail junction with Hwy. 101 and double back for the return trip.

 

BIRDING ACTIVITIES IN DEL NORTE COUNTY

 

With 422 species of birds recorded in Del Norte County, its a exciting hotspot for birdwatchers. The itineraries were developed by the experts. Each stop corresponds with the California Redwoods Birding Trail map found on the California Redwood Birding Trail website. You’ll also find clickable detailed maps, site directions, site descriptions, bird lists, and mention of the amenities and points of interest at or near each site.

All trips are dependent on time of year, migration patterns, weather, tides, and times of sunrise and sunset.

California Redwoods Birding Trail Brochure – Available through the Crescent City/Del Norte County Chamber of Commerceor the Crescent City Planning Department.  The Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center also stocks Alan D. Barron’s, A Birdfinding Guide to Del Norte County, upon which the trails and the birding itineraries are based.

ONE LONG DAY OF COASTAL BIRDING EXCURSION: STARTS JUST AFTER DAWN

1. Point St. George (northwest end of bluff – Site 7
2. Pebble Beach Drive – numerous stops, such as the 9th Street -Brother Jonathan Viewpoint – Site 5
3. Castle Rock National Wildlife Refuge (scope the island from several parking turnouts on Pebble Beach Drive – Site 6
4. Battery Point Lighthouse – CRBT Site 4
5. B Street Pier – Site 3
6. Beachfront Park – Site 2
7. Elk Creek Mouth – Site 1
8. Crescent City Harbor – Site 36
9. Whaler’s Island – end of Anchor Way – part of Site 3
10. South Beach – Site 37
11. Endert’s Beach – Site 38
12. Lunch
13. Lake Earl Coastal Lagoon Boat Launch – Site 11
14. Lake Earl Narrows – end of Tell Blvd. – Site 13)
15. Lake Tolowa Estuary and Beach – Site 15)
16. Alexandre EcoDairy Farms – Site 16
17. Pala Road – end of Pala Road – Site 17
18. County Boat Launch on Fred Haight Drive – Site19
19. Smith River Mouth and Estuary – Site 20
20. Pelican Beach (if there’s time before sunset – Site 21

ALTERNATE AFTERNOON ROUTE AFTER LUNCH – #12

1. Mill Creek Campground (seasonally open – Site 39
2. Lagoon Creek Coastal Trail and False Klamath Cove – Site 40
3. Klamath River Overlook – Site 41
4. Marshall Pond – Site 42
5. Klamath River Mouth and Estuary – Site 43

 

 

SECOND DAY INLAND HIGHER ELEVATION MOUNTAIN BIRDING EXCURSION: LOTS MORE DRIVING BETWEEN STOPS.

1. Walker Road – Site 23
2. Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park Campground – Day Use Area – Site 24
3. South Fork Road (many stops, CRBT Site 31)
4. Gasquet-Orleans Road – aka G.O. Road, many stops, subject to winter closure – Site 32
5. Big Flat (subject to winter closure) – Site 33
6. Ship Mountain – subject to winter closure – Site 34
7. Bear Basin Butte Botanical Area – subject to winter closure – Site 35

 

ACCESSIBLE, BEAUTIFUL, RELAXING DEL NORTE COUNTY ITINERARIES

If you to want relax on vacation by taking scenic drives through the redwoods and along the Pacific coastline, taking leisurely walks along an easily accessible beach or forest trail, witnessing the wildlife, or enjoying a local attraction, Del Norte County is the place.

Private vehicles can be driven slowly through ancient redwood forests and meadows filled with herds Roosevelt elk, birds and wild flowers. Look and listen closely. You might meet the soft eyes of an elk or hear the shriek of a hawk flying overhead. You’ll find lighthouses, tours, museums, art galleries and casual and fine dining. Lodging and RV Parks are both plentiful.

DAY ONE

Start with a leisurely breakfast and map out the day over coffee. If the wind is calm and the tide is out, this might be a good time to do some beach combing. Agates, shells and other fascinating gifts from the sea can be found along Pebble Beach. Tide pools offer a chance to see and study forms of life found nowhere else.

Make it an ocean day by taking a tour of Battery Point Lighthouse, but be sure to check the tides first. If weather calls for Plan B, consider spending some time at the Harbor Art Gallery, or wandering through The Del Norte Historical Society’s Main Museum.

Remember that ocean air makes everyone sleepy, so leave time for a nap. After dinner, you could catch a spectacular sunset from Endert’s Beach Lookout. As the sun goes down the lights of the little town sparkle and reflect across the bay.

DAY TWO

If you’re fortunate enough to be here on a Sunday morning, the champagne brunch at Patrick’s Creek Lodge is legendary. The grounds are lovely –a photographer’s paradise.

Today, take the opportunity to view the extremes of our incredibly varied coastal environment.

Driving back down Highway 199, you’ll come to a botanical loop, a short walk that showcases the fascinating Darlingtonia, a carnivorous plant that thrives in serpentine bogs.

A few miles farther, and you’ll come to Walker Road in the Reed-Simpson Grove. Here sound is muffled by the thick, rainforest growth. Stop to take a short stroll along one of the many trails, or park at the end to watch the river. It’s a world of prehistoric dimensions, where ferns are six feet tall and trees disappear into the sky.

For a mind-boggling change from rainforest to coastal dunes, spend the afternoon at Tolowa Dunes State Park. This is a favorite hike for those who seek level trails with a large variety of wildflowers and wildlife, and a favorite area for both birds and birders.
Day Three

If you’re going to be in Klamath on a Saturday, make reservations for the Fun Bus Tour to Fern Canyon. The tour leaves at noon and takes several hours. The beautiful trip includes many opportunities to see elk and other wildlife.

On your way to Klamath, take time to explore the amazing trail through Trees of Mystery. Here are unusual growths and beautiful carvings, as well as one of the most complete collections of Native American baskets to be found anywhere.

For those who enjoy fishing, the Klamath River is easily accessible. Take Highway 169 to Klamath Glen, which is inland just far enough to be a little warmer than the coast. Here, too, birding and wildflower varieties are spectacular, and many birders add prized species to their list on a visit to Klamath Glen.

After a day of exploring, consider dinner at the Steelhead Lodge, a fine restaurant and a fixture of the area for many years.

 

3 – Day Itinerary

Highway 101 at the Humboldt – Del Norte County Line North to the Oregon Border

 

Day 1: On Your Way to Crescent City, see these natural, historical and fun attractions of the Wild Rivers Coast

 

Redwood National and State Parks – Home to the tallest trees on Earth. With 133,000 combined acres of parkland, including more than 38,000 acres of old growth forest, this unique park protects the tallest trees on Earth, as well as indigenous plants, wildlife, rivers, prairie grassland, and coastline. www.nps.gov/redw/

 

Visit World War II Secret Coast Watchers Farmhouse -Radar Station B-17, which sits atop an ocean bluff south of Klamath, is an example of a World War II early warning radar station. The two structures include radar antennas and two machine gun emplacements.

The Old Klamath Bridge and Golden Bears -On December 22, 1964, the Klamath River flooded with the river reaching a level 18 feet above flood stage, 5 feet above the level of the 1955 flood. This flood washed away the original Douglas Memorial Bridge on what is now Highway 101. A small portion of the old bridge has been saved as a memorial and can still be seen today. A great spot for wildlife viewing and bird watching along the Klamath River.

Tour Thru Tree – One of the few remaining trees that you can actually drive through.  The sheer size of this redwood is startling.

 

 

 

 

Klamath Jet Boat Tours – The 2 hour trip will include thrills, white water, spins, and amazing scenery.  We will view bear, osprey, hawks, bald eagles, golden eagles, deer and elk. jetboattours.com/

 

 

 

 

Captain Courageous Monument -The Heroic Voyage of this crossbreed steer; floating downriver from Klamath Glen and up the coast into Crescent City Harbor, was an inspiration to the flood victims of Klamath. He embodied their courage, stamina, and indomitable spirit. A living memorial to the disastrous flood of 1964.

Klamath River Overlook – Requa Road -Enjoy breathtaking views, whale watching, and bird viewing at the mouth of the Klamath River, where freshwater merges with seawater after a journey of over 250 miles that begins high in the snow-laden Cascade Mountains of Southern Oregon.

 

Historic Requa Inn – Built in 1914, the Inn was a mainstay for the fishing and cannery industries around Klamath.  The Inn was a popular spot for many celebrities including Presidents when traveling up the north coast. www.requainn.com

 

 

Trees of Mystery and the Sky Trail –feel the awe-inspiring wonder that civilizations felt hundreds of years go as you explore the Trees of Mystery.  You will be overwhelmed by the unusual redwoods, enjoy a birds-eye view of the redwoods on the Sky Trail and walk among the largest milled-redwood carvings in the world.  www.treesofmystery.net/

 

 

Day 2:  Enjoy sites and activities in the Crescent City area:

 

Redwood National and State Parks – Home to the tallest trees on Earth. With 133,000 combined acres of parkland, including more than 38,000 acres of old growth forest, this unique park protects the tallest trees on Earth, as well as indigenous plants, wildlife, rivers, prairie grassland, and coastline. www.nps.gov/redw/

 

 

Howland Hill Road  – Scenic drive through the largest continuous forest of Old Growth Redwoods.  Best described as hiking in your car, this drive is not to be missed along the old stagecoach road.  Stretch your legs on many of the easy trails that parallel your drive.

 

 

Stout Grove – One of the most scenic groves of Redwood National & State Park.  You can get lost for hours in this beautiful grove of tall trees and huge ferns covering the forest floor.  A short walk to the bank of the Smith River brings even more incredible views and peaceful beauty of the Redwood National and State Parks.

 

Crescent City Overlook Elk viewing, whale watching, and stunning coastal views are highlights.

 

 

 

 

Enderts Beach – Take a short hike down to one of California’s “hidden” beaches.   Enjoy tide pools, a natural bridge and scenic views along the old Highway 1.

 

Elk Valley Casino – Elk Valley casino offers you a gaming experience that will make your visit a memorable one. www.elkvalleycasino.com/

 

Crescent City Harbor & Wildlife Viewing – View harbor seals, sea lions, and many birds from the walkways surrounding the harbor.  www.ccharbor.com/

 

Ocean World –One of the best privately owned small aquariums.  Visit tide pools, pet a shark, and see a wonderful seal show. www.oceanworldonline.com/

 

Gallery of Arts & Culture – Features outdoor sculptures of metal and wood, fine photography fused glass and many oil and watercolor paintings.

 

Marine Mammal Center  – The north coast Marine Mammal Center is a private non-profit organization, dedicated to the rescue and rehabilitation of stranded, sick or injured seals, sea Lions, dolphins, porpoises and whales along the northern most coast of California. www.northcoastmmc.org/

 

Battery Point Lighthouse – The Lighthouse and its museum is open to the public for tours including opportunities to look into the personal quarters of keepers and their families and the furniture and artifacts they have left behind since the 1850’s. Tours include a climb into the light tower. www.delnortehistory.org/lighthouse/

 

Del Norte County Historical Museum – The Museum is housed in the former County Hall of Records. It was built in 1926 and a portion of the building was used for the County Jail until 1963 when the present County Sheriff’s station opened. There are still some original jail cells on the second floor, which also serve as individual exhibit rooms. The Main Museum has a wealth of interesting displays. One room is devoted to artifacts of the local Tolowa and Yurok Native Americans. It includes one of the finest Native American basket collections in Northern California. Musical instruments, an old radio, phonographic and photographic equipment, excellent needlework, early logging and mining tools and equipment, and many fashions and furniture from yesteryear are just some of the objects and subjects represented and on display in the Main Museum. www.delnortehistory.org/

Tsunami Historical Walk – Take a historical walk and visit eight sites within easy walking distance to experience the devastation of the 1964 Tsunami.

 

Rumiano Cheese Factory – Started on a small dairy farm in 1919, Rumiano Cheese Company is the oldest family-owned cheese company in California.  www.rumianocheese.com/

 

 

 

 

Brother Jonathan Memorial & Overlook – This memorial is dedicated to those who lost their lives in the wreck of the Pacific Mail steamer Brother Jonathan at point St. George’s Reef, July 30, 1865. www.ohp.parks.ca.gov/

 

SS Emedio Memorial -Nearby are portions of the hull of the General Petroleum Corporation tanker S.S. Emidio, which on December 20, 1941 became the first casualty of the Imperial Japanese Navy’s submarine force action on California’s Pacific Coast. The ship was attacked some 200 miles north of San Francisco and five crewmen were killed. Abandoned, the vessel drifted north and broke up on the rocks off Crescent City. The bow drifted into the harbor, where it lay near this marker until salvaged in 1950.

 

Camp Lincoln – A United States military post was established here September 12, 1862 by the men of Company G, 2nd Regiment, Infantry, California Volunteers, to keep peace between the Indians, the miners and settlers of northwestern California. It was abandoned in May 1870. Commanding officer’s quarters and one barracks remain at the date of dedication of this site

 

Pebble Beach Drive – One of the most scenic coastal drives in California.  Magnificent sunsets, wildlife viewing, long walks on the beach, sea grottos, and tide pools to enjoy.

 

Point St. George & Lighthouse – Rising nearly sixteen stories above the sea, it was crowned with a giant first order lens which exhibited first light the night if October 20, 1891. First manned by keepers of the U.S. Service (1891-1939), and then by the Coast Guard (1939-1975) it was considered to be the most dangerous station in the service. Five keepers lost their lives while on duty there. Viewed from many locations around Crescent City, it can best be seen from Point St. George parking area west of the Crescent City Airport. www.stgeorgereeflighthouse.us/

 

 

Day 3:  Travel North to the Oregon Border and spend time at these stops

 

Tolowa Dunes State Park – Lake Earl Wildlife Area -This park takes in some of the finest wetlands habitat on California’s northern coast. An ancient sand dune complex that has evolved into several distinct ecological communities, Tolowa Dunes encompasses ocean beach, river, open and vegetated sand dunes, wooded ridges, and wetlands.   //www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=430

 

Rowdy Creek Fish Hatchery – Rowdy Creek Fish Hatchery is in operation 365 days each year. This hatchery raises more than 100,000 steelhead each year. www.RowdyCreek.com

 

Lucky 7 Casino – Enjoy all the excitement of a casino and a full service hotel with a friendly, intimate ambiance highlighted by Tolowa tribal heritage. -www.lucky7casino.com/‎

 

Xus Zip lines –Six zip lines will have you soaring at speeds of 45 miles per hour.  Enjoy the thrill of a giant swing. www.xusziplinerides.com

 

Pelican Bay State Beach -Pelican State Beach offers beautiful ocean views. The small, secluded beach is perfect for walking and beachcombing. The beach has the distinction of being the northern-most state beach.

 

2- Day Itinerary

Highway 199 From the Oregon Border to Crescent City

 

Day 1:  As you drive toward Crescent City and the cool misty air of the Pacific Ocean make these natural and historic places part of your stops.

 

Patrick Creek Lodge – See original example of work accomplished by the Civilian Conservation Corps.

 

Darlingtonia Trail – A showcase of the beauty of this rare unusual plant. This carnivorous plant, commonly known as the cobra lily, traps insects in its hollow tubular leaves, whose top is flared into a hollow dome with a forked “tongue” that gives the species its common name. The rare, strangely shaped plant is the only member of the pitcher plant family.

 

The Forks – View the scenic forks of the Smith River. Beautiful sunny beaches for sunbathing and swimming. Fish for steelhead trout and  enjoy the beautiful turquoise waters of this scenic river watershed.

 

 

 

Redwood National and State Parks – Home to the tallest trees on Earth. With 133,000 combined acres of parkland, including more than 38,000 acres of old growth forest, this unique park protects the tallest trees on Earth, as well as indigenous plants, wildlife, rivers, prairie grassland, and coastline. www.nps.gov/redw/

 

 

Howland Hill Road  – Scenic drive through the largest continuous forest of Old Growth Redwoods.  Best described as hiking in your car, this drive is not to be missed along the old stagecoach road.  Stretch your legs on many of the easy trails that parallel your drive.

 

 

Stout Grove – One of the most scenic groves of Redwood National & State Park.  You can get lost for hours in this beautiful grove of tall trees and huge ferns covering the forest floor.  A short walk to the bank of the Smith River brings even more incredible views and peaceful beauty of the Redwood National and State Parks.

Day 2:  Enjoy sites and activities in the Crescent City area:

 

Crescent City Overlook Elk viewing, whale watching, and stunning coastal views are highlights.

 

 

 

 

Enderts Beach – Take a short hike down to one of California’s “hidden” beaches.   Enjoy tide pools, a natural bridge and scenic views along the old Highway 1.

 

Elk Valley Casino – Elk Valley casino offers you a gaming experience that will make your visit a memorable one. www.elkvalleycasino.com/

 

Crescent City Harbor & Wildlife Viewing – View harbor seals, sea lions, and many birds from the walkways surrounding the harbor.  www.ccharbor.com/

 

Ocean World –One of the best privately owned small aquariums.  Visit tide pools, pet a shark, and see a wonderful seal show. www.oceanworldonline.com/

 

Gallery of Arts & Culture – Features outdoor sculptures of metal and wood, fine photography fused glass and many oil and watercolor paintings.

 

Marine Mammal Center  – The North Coast Marine Mammal Center is a private non-profit organization, dedicated to the rescue and rehabilitation of stranded, sick or injured seals, sea lions, dolphins, porpoises and whales along the northern most coast of California. www.northcoastmmc.org/

 

Battery Point Lighthouse – The Lighthouse and its museum is open to the public for tours including opportunities to look into the personal quarters of keepers and their families and the furniture and artifacts they have left behind since the 1850’s. Tours include a climb into the light tower www.delnortehistory.org/lighthouse/

Del Norte County Historical Museum – The Museum is housed in the former County Hall of Records. It was built in 1926 and a portion of the building was used for the County Jail until 1963 when the present County Sheriff’s station opened. There are still some original jail cells on the second floor, which also serve as individual exhibit rooms. The Main Museum has a wealth of interesting displays. One room is devoted to artifacts of the local Tolowa and Yurok Native Americans. It includes one of the finest Native American basket collections in Northern California. Musical instruments, old radio, phonographic and photographic equipment, excellent needlework, early logging and mining tools and equipment, and many fashions and furniture from yesteryear are just some of the objects and subjects represented and on display in the Main Museum. www.delnortehistory.org/

Tsunami Historical Walk – take a historical walk and visit eight sites within easy walking distance to experience the devastation of the 1964 Tsunami.

 

Rumiano Cheese Factory – Started on a small dairy farm in 1919, Rumiano Cheese Company is the oldest family-owned cheese company in California.  www.rumianocheese.com/

 

 

Brother Jonathan Memorial & Overlook – This memorial is dedicated to those who lost their lives in the wreck of the Pacific Mail steamer Brother Jonathan at point St. George’s Reef, July 30, 1865. www.ohp.parks.ca.gov/

 

SS Emedio Memorial -Nearby are portions of the hull of the General Petroleum Corporation tanker S.S. Emidio, which on December 20, 1941 became the first casualty of the Imperial Japanese Navy’s submarine force action on California’s Pacific Coast. The ship was attacked some 200 miles north of San Francisco and five crewmen were killed. Abandoned, the vessel drifted north and broke up on the rocks off Crescent City. The bow drifted into the harbor, where it lay near this marker until salvaged in 1950.

 

Camp Lincoln – A United States military post was established here September 12, 1862 by the men of Company G, 2nd Regiment, Infantry, California Volunteers, to keep peace between the Indians, the miners and settlers of northwestern California. It was abandoned in May 1870. Commanding officer’s quarters and one barracks remain at the date of dedication of this site.

 

Pebble Beach Drive – One of the most scenic coastal drives in California.  Magnificent sunsets, wildlife viewing, long walks on the beach, sea grottos, and tide pools to enjoy.

 

Point St. George & Lighthouse – Rising nearly sixteen stories above the sea, it was crowned with a giant first order lens which exhibited first light the night if October 20, 1891. First manned by keepers of the U.S. Service (1891-1939) and then by the Coast Guard (1939-1975) it was considered to be the most dangerous station in the service; 5 keepers lost their lives while on duty there. Viewed from many locations around Crescent City, it can best be seen from the Point St. George parking area west of the Crescent City Airport. www.stgeorgereeflighthouse.us/